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AMBASSADORS

Yeti Ambassador

Steven
Peebles

Redmond
,
Oregon
Ranch & Rodeo
Steven Peebles
Nothing keeps bareback rider Steven Peebles away from achieving his dreams, not even a near-death experience. On July 2, 2015, he was bucked off a horse in competition and almost lost his life - punctured ribs escalated to internal bleeding. He was rushed to the hospital, and in minutes, surrounded by an entire team of doctors urgently caring for his near-fatal injuries. Months later, Steven won the World Championship - recovering wounds and all. His perseverance, coupled with his mentorship with world-champion Bobby Mote, helped push him through the "tough it up" cowboy mentality. And that same strength has given him the momentum to qualify for the NFR seven times, and continue to compete fearlessly no matter what comes his way.

Q:

What goes through your head when you first wake up in the morning before you bareback ride?

A:

I try not to overthink my upcoming ride - I do my best when I'm on a routine and treat it like any other ride, no matter the stakes.

Q:

Where is your favorite place to bareback ride?

A:

The Wrangler National Finals Rodeo is the ultimate place. It has the highest stakes, and brightest lights, so that's for sure my favorite place to compete. Outside of the NFR, I'd say the Calgary Stampede.

Q:

How do you up your game year after year?

A:

I am a firm believer in the mental game. I workout in the off-season as well, but I spend most of my time sharpening my form, watching films, and trying to improve my mental focus.

Q:

If you could do anything better what would it be?

A:

My sport is a demanding one and it comes with its share of injuries. When I go through these injuries, I work hard at rehabilitation. My only wish is that this time spent rehabbing could be spent further improving my physical condition instead of always trying to get back to 100%.

Q:

Who are your heroes? Who do you look up to?

A:

Bobby Mote was instrumental in getting me started in my career. He was a great mentor to get me where I am today. Also, all of my friends and family who support me are my heroes. I truly could not be here without their support.

Q:

What haven't you accomplished that you aspire to do in your lifetime?

A:

I've always wanted to qualify for the WNFR at both ends of the arena (in two events). My biggest goal, however, is to win multiple championships. I got my first one in 2015 and that was a huge goal of mineā€¦but now I want to be a multi-title bareback rider.

Q:

What part of you, or what you do, reflects a spirit of restlessness?

A:

My sport really encompasses restlessness - we are always on the move traveling to new places, competing against new athletes, riding new horses, and seeking new titles. My personality also reflects restlessness. I hate sitting around (which is why an injury is so hard for me to deal with). When I do have a "break" in my tour, I have tons of hobbies and am always getting involved in new things (hunting, fishing, extreme adventures).

Q:

If there is any love-hate relationship with any aspect of what you do, can you describe what that is?

A:

I love the fact that I can make a living doing what I love to do. Seeing new places and traveling to new cities and countries is something I love, but the downside is I have to spend so much time away from home as well.

Q:

What sound or noise do you love?

A:

The buzzer when I make the whistle or calling in an elk in the middle of the mountains during bow season.

Q:

What would be your day job if you weren't doing what you currently doing?

A:

Probably something in real estate - I enjoy building cabinets and woodworking, and I've actually renovated some houses in the past.

Q:

If you could bring anybody in the world with you to do what you love (dead or alive), who would it be?

A:

My grandpa. He was always so supportive of my career and he passed away. I would have loved for him to tour the rodeo circuit with me.

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