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Carter

Occupation. Obligation. Obsession. A fisherman to his DNA, Carter Andrews has no choice but to go out there and catch everything that swims.
Fishing

Photography and story by Perrin James

I've known Carter for a few years now. We met in Northern Panama on the Hannibal bank when he was running the boat for us. Within a few hours, he tried to feed us to a handful of Orcas eating turtles.  Since then we've been to multiple countries around the world doing everything from chasing Marlin to trekking through the Bolivian jungles. His excitement for finding adventure and fish is contagious and you can always count on the unexpected, with a cold vodka tonic on the side.

I don't think there is anything more satisfying than free diving below the boat and calling out all the fish down there, seeing the exact depths, numbers and species, and watching Carter calculate his plan on the best way to catch that one fish. One thing that remains a constant is the back-and-forth banter between what I see underwater and what they are actually catching.

We call him Big Boy Carter. Although his giant size and very loud voice may be intimidating, he will bring an entire village to smiles. He is always making friends with absolutely every single person we meet and proving to be one of those genuine southern folk that you want to drink a cold beer with.

From swimming with underwater crocodiles in murky water to almost being harpooned by blue or striped marlin, I can always count on almost dying at least once on every project with him. If it swims in the ocean or somewhere deep in the jungle, Carter Andrews will find it and he will – without a doubt – catch it.

Carter Andrews
Carter Andrews

Backing down on a blue marlin 100 miles offshore in Costa Rica, I kept screaming “Make it rain!” Carter took one over the stern and the entire boat was full of water. Buckets, shoes and fish were floating around the deck.

Carter Andrews
Carter Andrews

We rolled up to one of the oldest tackle shops in Los Suenos, Costa Rica and instantly had a good laugh at the younger Carter Andrews pictured in the window. There were a few Polaroids taped to the window that were almost 20-something years old.

Carter Andrews
Carter Andrews

Carter and our friend Julio Mezza releasing a striped marlin of the coast of Magdelena Bay, Baja. The craziest marlin run in over 10 years. We were the only boat out there.

Carter Andrews
Carter Andrews

Striped marlin hooked off the coast of Baja Mexico

Carter Andrews
Carter Andrews

Walls of striped marlin off the coast of Mexico. Never seen anything like this in my life. Every time I would go underwater there would be hundreds underneath the boat. A special day for everyone after the logistical nightmare of running 150 miles to this spot.

Carter Andrews
Carter Andrews

Feeding frenzy of striped marlin. The bait stuck onto me for almost an hour and every time I would kick away the marlin would begin to feed again. The colors on these fish while feeding was beyond mental. Top 3 days in the water ever.

Carter Andrews
Carter Andrews

En route to the jungle somewhere in Bolivia. We left a seemingly normal runaway to pile into one of the oldest Cessna’s imaginable. We landed on a cutout airstrip that had to be originally cut out for moving drugs through the country. I don't think I've ever been this scared on a plane.

Carter Andrews
Carter Andrews

Carter in the Bolivian jungle searching for the Golden Dorado. Everyday we'd climb aboard our dugout canoes, fill our mouths with coca leaves and head up stream with our Indian friends guiding the way. It was hot, the bugs made you draw blood instantly and we were wet all day.

Carter Andrews
Carter Andrews

Sandstorm in the middle of the Bolivian jungle. We were in this small windstorm right before the first rain of the season

Carter Andrews
Carter Andrews

Carter's attempt at handling a giant Maturo Bolivian catfish. These catfish were absolutely huge. I swam into one and thought it was a croc.

Carter Andrews
Carter Andrews

Carter and the chief of the village heading back after a long day of fishing. 

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